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That’s right, it doesn’t degrade. It IMPROVES. What type of rope is best for you? I have some recommendations above, under “What type of rope should I use? ”, but here are some qualtiies that will let you understand why I made those recommendations and let you better decide for yourself. “Natural Fiber” Ropes:. The stuff I got from Twisted Monk is a very different story. Once I finally ordered some, I had a very different experience; which just goes to show, the supplier makes a huge difference in the quality of the rope you get. It looks great on a person, particularly after it’s shined up, and is just a really sweet, responsive rope that does pretty much whatever I ask of it. Hemp never stood a chance, because jute got to me first – as far as rope goes, it’s my one true love. It is considerably stronger than the Zen rope I just mentioned; and again, is rated. Apparently it is often used as boat rope, so I’d say it’s fairly hardwearing and durable.

Far fewer knots required. It’s generally quite strong; you can usually put it under heavy load with minimal fear of stretch or breakage unless its obviously frayed. It is a natural fiber, so it has decent “tooth” (enough friction so that knots will hold well without special consideration). For some thoughts on what thicknesses and lengths you want, check out: Rope Lengths. Nylon is nicely smooth and comfortable as well, but it has very low tooth, so you need to use surgeon’s knots instead of square knots and any half-hitch style knot should be done three times instead of two. (If you don’t, your partner may be able to manipulate the tie and wriggle out, and rope bottoms kind of hate that.

It’s just stiff and cumbersome and not fun. However, once I removed the core, that changed things considerably (If you want to know how to remove the core, send me a message or something and I’ll update). It’s a synthetic bondage rope; this means it has a very different level of tooth than the cotton rope or a natural fibre. It’s very smooth, with almost no tooth, which means a lot less friction, making it a slicker, faster rope. Bondage Rope: Types of Rope Used In Bondage. Cheap cotton braid. You can do a lot with it, it’s cheap, washable, etc. Just make darn sure to keep those EMT shears handy and be prepared for a bit of swearing and frustration over the knots if it’s a loose braid.

However, once I removed the core, that changed things considerably (If you want to know how to remove the core, send me a message or something and I’ll update). Pros. Tossa is actually a pretty tight lay, which means it needs a bit of extra conditioning or a long period of break in time before it’s really good to tie with, due to that extra stiffness. That said, spending a bit of time breaking in your rope isn’t really that onerous. If you’re looking for good restraint bondage rope and enjoy using knots, this is probably what you should go for. Again, not recommended for shibari, but everything else goes, and I’ve heard that there are actually dyes which will change the colour of nylon.

And naturally I’ll tell you which are my favorites and why, but at the end of the day I’ll leave you to make up your own mind, based on your own sets of priorities, which may very well be different from mine. I’ll even include pictures! Aren’t I just the nicest? Pros:. It’s easily accessible; cheaper than most bondage ropes, it has decent tooth (essentially, friction; what holds your knots and stuff together), it’s washable, and it’s decently strong. But every time I’ve used it, whatever I’ve been wearing or my partner has been wearing has wound up dusted in the stuff. It also makes things more likely to be itchy, sneezy, etc. Very washable. Cons:. And wasn’t it just frustrating as hell? No.