South African Airways Carriage of Firearms and Ammunition

August 27, 2013 in Firearms, Hunting Info, Hunting trophies by Hunting Legends

General hunting info

SAA CARRIAGE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION

Domestic (within and from the Republic of South Africa)

Departure (Inclusive of International departures) Firearms may NOT be packed inside checked luggage and must therefore be packed in an appropriate lockable firearm container or case, separate from checked luggage.

Ammunition must be separated from weapons and may be packed within checked luggage, but must be properly secured in an ammunition case or solid box. No ammunition may be packed loosely in checked baggage or within the same case as firearms.

We strongly recommend that ammunition be packed in lockable cases, which can be handed in as loose items at the firearm counters to avoid possible delays during checked baggage screening. All firearms and ammunition must be declared to the airline check-in agent at the time of check-in.

Undeclared firearms and ammunition within checked luggage will result in such baggage being rejected during mandatory checked baggage screening, and will result in the passenger being required to open such baggage for further inspection and safe handling, or the confiscation of such items for further processing and forwarding on a subsequent flight.

Check-in agents will issue the relevant baggage tags and will then direct firearm owners to the appropriate firearm desk for inspection and processing of firearms and ammunition for secure handling to the aircraft.

During the acceptance process at the appropriate firearm desk, the following will be conducted: • The owner of the firearm will be required to produce a valid license or temporary import permit for the firearm(s) and ammunition.

The owner of the firearm(s) will be required to make and declare the firearm(s) safe and unloaded for carriage.

• Security staff will request the firearm owner to open his/her checked luggage to verify that ammunition is securely packed and that the total weight of ammunition per license holder does not exceed 5kg’s in weight. • The owner of the firearm will be required to complete a firearm register for handover to security staff, who will ensure the secure loading of such items.

• The staff at the firearm desk will send a pre-advise notification message to the receiving station, advising them of details and loading positions of firearms.

• Checked baggage containing ammunition will be affixed with a special tag, indicating that such bag was already subjected to inspection, to avoid screening authorities from delaying or confiscating such bag for further security controls.

Handguns (Pistols, revolvers, etc)

A R100 handling fee is raised for the carriage of handguns. Payment will only be accepted in the form of credit cards or cash at the firearm desk or allocated firearms acceptance area. These firearms will be processed at the firearm desk for safe carriage in the hold of the aircraft.

There will be no charge for handguns carried with hunting equipment if packed in the same case as hunting rifles.

Rifles (in gun case / rifle bags) Rifles must be processed via the firearm desk for safe carriage and may form part of your free baggage allowance. Thereafter the excess baggage allowance will be raised as applicable

Ammunition

A maximum of 5kg securely boxed ammunition per passenger will be permitted for carriage either as a separate piece of baggage or within checked baggage in the hold of the aircraft. Screening authorities may however delay baggage containing ammunition, if such ammunition was not declared at check-in and is therefore not marked with an appropriate tag indicating that such ammunition was already security inspected.

Arrival

Upon arrival, passengers are required to proceed to the allocated firearm desk to collect firearms. Checked baggage containing ammunition may be collected at the normal airport baggage carousel. Ammunition handed in separately may be collected at the firearm desk.

International (All SAA flights departing from outside the Republic of South Africa, arriving in South Africa)

Standard legislation pertaining to the carriage of weapons and ammunition for each destination will apply. It is therefore the traveller’s responsibility to verify and ensure compliance with local laws on the possession and carriage of weapons.

Departures

Passengers should not pack any firearms within checked baggage. Firearms must be packed in suitable lockable firearm cases or bags. Where possible, declare firearms and request the airline to place a firearm identification tag on such items, as this will assist in the correct loading and delivery handling on SAA flights arriving in South Africa. Where passengers originate their journey on South African Airways, we request that you declare the firearms and any checked baggage containing ammunition to check-in staff for appropriate handling and labelling.

Ammunition may be carried within checked luggage, provided that it is securely packed in a lockable or secure container, and that the total weight does not exceed 5kg’s of ammunition per passenger carrying a firearm. (In general, most airlines allow the carriage of ammunition in terms of the dictums of ICAO Dangerous Goods Standards and associated airline processes followed in terms of IATA requirements/guidance).

DO NOT pack ammunition loosely in checked baggage.

Arrivals

Upon arrival in South Africa, all declared or identified firearms may be collected directly from the firearm office just after immigration. Any firearms either not declared upon departure, or not identified by an appropriate label will be delivered to the normal baggage carousal for collection. After collection of checked baggage containing ammunition, you are required to proceed to the SA Police Firearm Office, where all necessary import permits and other documentation will be finalised.

Remington Model 798 Safari Grade

August 27, 2013 in Firearms, Gunroom, hunter, Hunting Info, Hunting trophies by Hunting Legends

Wide Logo

Remington Model 798 Safari Grade

Review of the Remington Model 798 Safari Grade

Lurking, almost unsung in the Remington 08 lineup, is an absolutely terrific rifle called the Model 798 Safari Grade. It is a true, long-action, all-steel Model 98 Mauser stocked in laminated wood that looks like high-grade walnut.

The barrel is 22 inches long, which is the proper length for a dangerous game rifle, and the front sling swivel stud is out on the barrel where it won’t gouge your hand. The price is $1,119 for a .375 H&H, and $1,189 for a .458.

Remington has been a well known hunting rifle in Africa, seeing a lot of action and living up to most expectations. It’s a good solid working rifle and we can recommend the Model 798 Safari Grade any day. We have had several clients over the years hunting with their trusted Remingtons and we can vouch that we have never seen a failure or miss fire in the years working and experiencing the Remingtons.

The guys up at RW HART & SON also use Remington actions on their custome Hart Rifles and have also only spoken highly of these guns. The Remington’s are your typical good off the shelf buy rifle’s if you don’t have the bucks to spend on a custom HART for example. They are accurate for their purpose and will do the job in Africa. Their 375 H&H Magnum rifles sure hold a fair amount of trophy value down in Africa and you won’t go wrong.

We however will always advise you to speak to the pro’s before going out and buying yourself a new gun, so take us up on the invitation and speak to BOB HART at RW HART & SON. The Hart family are as good as gold and will go out of their way to give you solid and free advice. Contact BOB HART at: www.rwhart.com today for your personal and good advise. Bobby has hunted with us in Africa several times and hass experience with the big stuff too.

798Safari

SCI FOR HUNTERS

August 27, 2013 in African Safaris, Conservation, Firearms, Gunroom, hunter, Hunting Ethics, Hunting trophies, Nambia, South Africa, Sport Hunting by Hunting Legends

Hunting Legends

Thank you for supporting Hunting Legends International, by visiting our website:

The debate between hunters and conservationists will always exist, there is no doubt about that. Perhaps the fundamental contribution of ammunition against ethical hunting, is provided by un-ethical hunters themselves. It is and has always been imprtant to identify the rogue’s in our industry and to root them out where ever possible!

It our humble opinion that client’s and visting tourists can actually play a much more important role in this process, and thereby contribute towards removing the fly by nights from this industry.

The obvious way to achieve this, is to not to accept the bad, and the un-ethical services, such vistors or hunters some times encounter. When a tourist or visiting hunter encounters such un-ethical practices during or after his visit, it is important for that person, to take the matter further, and not just to accept it, and write it off as a bad experience.

In this way, relevant authorities and organisations governing or protecting the industry can get to hear of these mal practices, and assist in putting an end to such operators.

Organisations such as SCI (Safari Club International) can play a vital role in such dealings, and also link the hunter up with  the applicable governing authorities.

In order to protect our industry, it is vital for us to stand up against the people doing us the most damage, and sorry to say, it is often players and operators within our own industry that do this.

Help us rid the industry of the foul players, by going public and making their un-ethical practices within the industry known! Help boycot such operators on the trade shows, conventions and media. Help the industry, to help you!

Great adventure and TV show in America

August 27, 2013 in African Safaris, hunter, Hunting trophies, Sport Hunting by Hunting Legends

Sportsmenna

Click image above:

SPORTSMEN OF NORTH AMERICA

If you live in the United States of America, then you must get in touch with these guy’s. Sportsmen of North America is a great membership organization for hunters!

Started by Keith Powell, Sportsmen of North America is growing from strength to strength – week after week. They host their own Cable TV Shows and sponsor GIVE AWAY hunts every week of the year!

If you haven’t visited http://www.sportsmenna.com yet you are missing out big time!

These are homest christian folks with a passion for hunting and the great outdoors, and strive to give their members the best value for their buck!

Sportsmen of North America visited us this year in Africa, and we had a blast! Keith Powell, Heath Painter and Bobby Hart (RW HART & SON) came to Namibia this year, and we filmed an excellent hunt and TV show which will be showing soon.

Make sure to visit SPORTSMENNA.COM today, and check out their membership details!

Hunting Legends

Hunting has conservation role

August 27, 2013 in Conservation, hunter, Hunting Ethics, Hunting trophies by Hunting Legends

Hunting Legends

Hunting ‘has conservation role’

By Elli Leadbeater

Rifle-toting tourists hunting exotic animals could actually help protect Africa’s vulnerable species, a leading conservationist has suggested.Elephant populations had benefited from a permit system that allowed sport hunters to kill a limited number of the beasts, according to Eugene Lapointe.

Mr Lapointe was head of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) between 1982-90.

Animal welfare campaigners rejected the idea as “morally unjustifiable”.

Writing in the BBC News website’s Green Room, Mr Lapointe, president of the International Wildlife Management Consortium (IWMC), said that despite the best efforts of conservationists, the number of threatened species continued to grow.

Silhouette of an African elephant
Elephants are one species to have benefited, Mr Lapointe argues
He suggested that it was time to reconsider bans on hunting: “Unfortunately, most African economies are poor and wildlife conservation has to compete with many pressing demands for public money.”So conservation projects are going to be most successful if they can be self-supporting; in other words, if they can generate income and provide local jobs,” he wrote.

A number of nations in southern Africa had adopted a “sustainable use” philosophy, including Namibia, South Africa and Botswana, he added.

“They have issued permits to sport hunters to kill a limited number of elephants that are pre-selected according to factors like age and sex. They cannot shoot breeding animals, for example,” Mr Lapointe explained.

As a result, these nations had well-stocked and healthy elephant populations and poaching was not a major problem, he observed.

Green Room graphic (Image: BBC)Read Eugene Lapointe’s Green Room article
Costly conservationThe idea of “trophy hunting” being a weapon in the conservationists’ armoury to protect vulnerable species was supported by Peter Lindsey from the University of Zimbabwe.

“Realistically, for conservation to succeed, wildlife has to pay for itself in Africa,” Dr Lindsey told a recent meeting at London Zoo.

“If local people do not benefit, it is usually lost.”

Trophy hunting involves allowing high-paying guests to shoot in the company of a professional hunting guide. Each hunter pays, on average, 10-20 times more than most eco-tourists would for their holiday.

He said that it could encourage landowners to accommodate and protect threatened wildlife in areas that do not appeal to most eco-tourists because they are politically unstable, too remote, or simply less scenic.

In South Africa, landowners were given permission to allow shooting of excess male white rhinos once the species began to recover after a sharp decline.

This gave landowners an incentive to buy and provide land for the rhinos, and this is thought to have significantly accelerated their recovery.

Dr Lindsey, who is not a hunter, carried out research to assess both the positive and negative effects of hunting on conservation.

He found that the industry is not without setbacks. Estimates of how many animals can be shot without threatening the population are sometimes based on guesswork, because no research data is available.

Irresponsible lodge owners, who allowed illegal and unethical practises, such as hunting caged animals or shooting from cars, posed a severe threat to the industry’s prospects.

Hunters also needed to find ways to make sure that the money from rich tourists did not end up in overseas bank accounts, but reached local communities, he added.

‘Unjustifiable’

These concerns were shared by animal welfare groups. International Fund for Animal Welfare (Ifaw) spokeswoman Rosa Hill called the idea of shooting elephants and rhinos “morally unjustifiable”.

“There is very little evidence that the funds raised from killing wildlife are ploughed back into conservation,” she said.

“There are also biological reasons why trophy hunting is not a good idea. Generally, hunters want to kill the biggest, strongest and fittest animals and this can have disastrous implications for the species.

Ms Hill said a lack of knowledge about how many animals there were and how the creatures behaved could result in a sudden population crash.

“Trophy hunting quotas are not set with proper knowledge of true population sizes, so it can be difficult to measure a species’ decline,” she explained.

But Dr Lindsey believed that the overall shortfalls did not outweigh the conservation benefits.

He said: “The industry’s not perfect, and we have to work on the problems; but there is no question in my mind that if hunting were to be banned, the conservation consequences in Africa would be dire.”

It is evident from this article that extreme conservationists and ‘the professional hunting fraternity’ still do not see eye to eye on this matter.

What puzzle’s me most is the ignorance of Ms Hill, and her belief that we as ‘professional hunters’ are just in it for the killing of the biggest and the best!

I cannot however share her doubt, that there still are several un-ethical and inexprienced operators in the industry. In perhaps any industry, there are and always will be fly by nights, not to mention even in conservation cirlces.

The fact however, is that conservation and breeding sustainable animal populations are even more important to us, than to Ms Hill perhaps. Our very lively hood depends on how we manage our wildlife and resources, and we thus cannot afford to kill every big thing that comes across our sights. Contrary to what Ms Hill may believe it is also not always the biggest animals who have the best genes, and do the best job in nature. Perhaps Ms Hill will be pleasantly surprised to find that there are companies like Real Africa Safari Holdings, which takes pride in our operations, and take conservation very seriously.

If we don’t breed and see to it that we protect our gene pool’s, we won’t have any trophy hunters knocking on our doors soon!

We believe and maintain that conservationists and hunters can find an amicable solution and strategy together, for the benefit of conservation and wildlife.

On a one on one basis, our customers and ourselves, out spend almost any conservationist’s annual budget in developing our own wildlife resources.

Why should we as ethical and professional hunters, thus always put up with the grunt and disdain of some conservationists. We are proud of our sport and proud of the fact that we invest more than we harvest!

Share your comments with us please, by simply hitting the comment button below and there you go!

 

 

Dr Peter Lindsey with lion
 There’s no question in my mind that if hunting were to be banned, the conservation consequences in Africa would be dire
Dr Peter Lindsey
African Elephant (Image: BBC)
Elephants that trample crops are often shot or poisoned by locals